Using Atom with IDE, need advice


#1

So, I’m starting my first project, an application, but I’m not feeling the syntax theme in my IDE, I would prefer to use Atom instead. What I wanna know is do I write everything in Atom and then save it in a folder and open and run it in the IDE or do I create an empty project in the IDE, save it to a folder and then open it in Atom, will it then save that in the IDE too? If someone could walk me through the process, just wanna know exactly how it works or if I can even do what I’m planning this way before I start so I know I’m not wasting my time or anything.


#2

Which IDE? In some cases, IDEs create special files for their own use that aren’t part of the code, so making the project in the IDE would be ideal. That makes sure that your more specialized application is happy with how things are set up.


#3

I’m using Netbeans atm, trying to download Visual Studio(so many issues with installation) I have Eclipse too but Netbeans seems a lot better. I know using the IDE would be ideal but Atom is more enjoyable to use and the syntax theme in Netbeans for C++ isn’t great, some keywords and things have no color, having the color helps make sure I’m spelling everything right so I’m less prone to mistakes in Atom. I want to have the whole project in the IDE but I just wanna write the code in Atom and then like put it into the IDE.


#4

I had problems with that, too. I fixed it by downloading the ISO instead of the web installer. That way, all the essential install files are on your computer.

I know using the IDE would be ideal

That depends. Are you using the IDE’s other features? If you’re just writing and compiling code, Atom can do just fine.


#5

I’m still waiting for VS to uninstall the failed download atm(taking longer than the actual download), hopefully that link will work. I finally figured out how to edit the colors for Netbeans, not great but a lot better than what it was, I figured out how to open the Netbeans project in Atom and when I saved it, the original project changed in Netbeans, so pretty much what I expected, very frustrating trying to figure it all out though. I really would prefer VS to Netbeans, it looks better and I thinks it more geared towards C++ than Netbeans’ Java, I’m sure it has more bells and whistles too and every tutorial for everything uses VS and it’s just so annoying tryna follow it with a different IDE. I’m gonna start the project off with the Netbeans/Atom combo for now, we’ll see how it goes. Thanks for the link anyway.


#6

The bells and whistles aren’t necessary. What’s necessary is to have well-formed code and a compiler to turn it into an executable, which Atom can do if you have g++ on your machine and set up the right package to send your files to it. Hell, you can write C++ with Notepad if you want to be a masochist. Pick the editor that you feel best working with. IDEs offer you some fancy tracking, debugging, and optimization tools, but those tools are also aimed at enterprise applications with millions of lines of code. If you never top a couple thousand lines, it probably doesn’t matter. What does matter is your comfort in the environment.


#7

I finally got Visual Studio downloaded, turns out I had it right the first time but there’s no shortcut created, I ended up downloading it multiple times and it messed everything up, all I had to do was look for it in your god damn search bar. I probably should of watched the video they provide the first time, I feel like an idiot hahah.