Use Discord instead of Slack?


#1

I’ve seen a lot of huge dev communities migrating from Slack to Discord

Yes, Discord is made for gamers and Slack for professionals but, Discord beats Slack in so many points and I’ve used a lot Slack for CTF etc but Discord is so smooth and friendly.

Here is some of open-source project who know work on Discord.


#2

Wouldn’t this be better suited posted to Slack? :slight_smile:


#3

What do you mean by “To Slack”.

Is this posted in the wrong spot ? Or forum ? Did I miss some tags ?

If you are talking about posting my question to https://atomio.slack.com you should maybe read it first.


#4

I did read it. You were suggesting that people using Slack should use Discord instead. It seems only logical (to me at least) that you make the message visible to your target audience, no?


#5

You’re right I’ll repost it on Slack channel too but the forum question is the first thing to do.

I’ve done this when I find out the slack topic


#6

Oh, come on. It’s the same discussion every couple of months. We had this with Gitter and next up someone else will suggest using Riot or Stride.


#7

IRC for life~!


#8

Never heard of them, Stride looks ok but neither of them is facing Discord.


#9

IRC “was” damn cool as Slack


#10

Never heard of them, Stride looks ok but neither of them is facing Discord.

You keep saying that, but you haven’t provided a single argument on why that might be. It’s free, but so are Gitter and Riot. If you want to win anybody over, make a point!

Tbh, I see little to no difference between any of them. Personally, I’m open to use whatever the majority does. I’m generally not too happy about the the fragmentation with messengers, you need 10 messengers to talk to 10 people. Clients like Franz are helping, but the problem remains.


#11

#12

@DIDIx13 that does not help us understand what advantages it has over Slack, since that comparison page doesn’t even include Slack to begin with. What we are asking for are specific examples that you can give demonstrating what things Discord can do that Slack cannot, and why those features are a reason we should switch.


#13

The app is made for a more casual audience, and while that’s not to say the app isn’t professional in appearance, it’s focus on gaming and friends list makes it feel like a far more welcoming app than the business-first feel of Slack. If you’re looking for a replacement for Skype, it’s call quality and low-latency can’t be beaten, and the app is easy to pick up and learn right away. If you’re interested in meeting new people, the server function works well, and setting up your own server only takes a few minutes of your time.

Discord doesn’t charge you for having more than 10k messages. You can use the same discord account everywhere(and change your name for each server if you really want it). Discord seems to be getting tonnes of updates very regularly.

I was sceptical at first but the amount of stuff (voice, search, video/screen sharing in video call (you can even adjust the quality)) they’ve added in such a short amount of time won me over. I think if they target the business market more they can stomp out Slack. The only problem is that Slack is becoming an industry standard for IT so integrations for it are everywhere. The slack compatible webhook discord provides helps with this a bit (even though it’s a bit broken).

Some notable dev features include:
– Slack Compatible API layer – meaning every service that lets you specify a slack incoming webhook URL – you can use with Discord. (We’ve tested this so far with BuildKite, DataDog, CircleCI & more).
– Github/TravisCI support out of the box (with more integrations to come).

TL;DR: Keep in mind that Discord update itself way faster, very impressive from them.


#14

FWIW, I think discord is a much better product than slack. They have more features (voice chat, dark mode, wayyyy more admin controls, better mobile apps, no message limit), and they’re on a much faster update cycle. They also are monetizing individual users (optionally, $5/mo) rather than entire teams at once (slack’s pricing is pretty high, and not published). I’m also not worried about discord’s longevity.

That said, I think it would be a mistake to switch unless slack stops meeting our needs. In order to properly switch to discord we’d need:

  • a slew of announcements on slack
  • 7454 (worst case, and counting) PRs to update every package to point to the new chat server
  • Updates to the atom.io website
  • some kind of solution to the “now we have two places that people use” problem so we don’t fragment the community
  • a bunch of things I’m not thinking of that would go very poorly

Unless slack decides to suddenly become (more?) user hostile and becomes untenable as our chat solution, I think we should stick with it. It’s good enough.


#15

Hi @DIDIx13 I asked github about this last year and they said they didn’t want to make a GitHub/Atom discord server because they were already happy with Slack


#16

Hi @SHADOWELITE7 this is sad but understandable of course.