Hydrogen not working after changing Python install location (Windows 10)

Sorry if this is a stupid question and I’m missing something obvious - also, let me know if this is a question better asked of the Hydrogen folks.

I reinstalled Python in a different location to fix another issue I was having, and now every time I try to run Hydrogen it pops up this message:

‘C:\Users\BernoullisQuaver\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python37\python.exe’ is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.

Well, no ****, that’s the old install location, the new one is just ‘C:\Python37\python.exe’. I made sure my system path variables were updated, restarted and reinstalled everything I could think of, what am I missing?

EDIT: It may be looking for a “python3”, but I’ve only got the one version and it answers to just “python”.

Try reinstalling the iPython kernel. There’s a chance that it stored the location of your previous Python install somewhere.

Done - entered pip uninstall ipykernel and thenpip install ipykernel in the command line. Still not working. I think Atom has the location of the previous install stored somewhere, I’ve reinstalled Hydrogen too. Even tried reinstalling Atom but I’m not sure I managed to do a complete, clean reinstall.

I finally caved, made a copy of my Python .exe, and saved it in the old path. It works now, but it’s popping up this message - what’s going on?

Capture-1

Any configurations that Atom has stored should be in C:\Users\BernoullisQuaver\.atom, and you can try renaming that folder, restarting Atom, and then installing Hydrogen again by itself just to check. I don’t know whether that would do anything or not, but it’s a low-cost experiment to try.

I think you will have to ask the Hydrogen/iPython people for more technical help if you want to uncover the root cause, but I think I can offer you a solution that’s better than the one you have. You can make a special kind of file at C:\Users\BernoullisQuaver\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python37 called a symbolic link that can be thought of as an uber-shortcut. The benefit of the symbolic link is that it appears for all intents and purposes to be the folder or file you put as the target, so any user or program that looks for the old Python37/ will be seamlessly dropped into the new Python37/ and won’t even be able to tell the difference.