How to set up SFTP in a New Project - One per Website?


#1

I just started using Atom and want to use sftp. I have it set up and running, but I’m wondering if I have the .ftpconfig file setup in the wrong place. It’s under .atom. Is that where it’s supposed to be? I want to be able to work on websites through Atom. So, I thought I could set up one sftp per site in a work project folder. If Atom allows that, can you suggest how to do it? I’ve listened to Lynda.com class on Atom, other tutorials, and I can’t figure it out. Any insight on creating project folders with specific sftp capability would be greatly appreciated.


#2

Atom does not have any SFTP capabilities. There are a few different packages that do, but in order to answer your question, we have to know which package you are using.


#3

Hi, I’m using the Remote-FTP Package, Version 0.9.2. It states that it requires a project. When I open Atom, I can open a project, but is there a way to create a project folder at the start? I think that is where I’m having a problem: no project folder and, therefore the .ftpconfig file inadvertently got in the .atom directory.


#4

Why do you feel the need to create the project before opening Atom? There is certainly a workaround, but I’m not understanding your use case and so I don’t have a clear picture of your workflow. If you’re not using a generator to scaffold out your project, you can do everything from within Atom.

I think that is where I’m having a problem: no project folder and, therefore the .ftpconfig file inadvertently got in the .atom directory.

Just create a new configuration file in your project folder and delete the one in .atom.


#5

Hi, Thank you. Your answer helped me. I will delete the .ftpconfig in .atom and put it inside the project folder. I apologize if I was not clear with my use; this is a new environment for me. I appreciate your responses.


#6

Atom is nothing more than a code editor with a very large amount of its internal functionality broken open to be accessible to third-party code. Aside from some specific behavior regarding its definition of “project” (which is substantially less hands-on than IDEs that are concerned with projects), baseline Atom doesn’t behave much differently from any other general editor.