Error Installing Atom on Windows 10


#1

Failed to load C:\Users\test.atom\init.coffee
unexpected <


#2

Looks like you have an unexpected < in your init script.

Try running atom --safe in the command prompt.

Your path is also weird, but one thing at a time.


#3

You are a genius!

When I ran atom --safe, the error message went away!

What do you mean, “Your path is also weird.”?

I do not get to choose my path.

When I download Atom, it installs itself automatically, without any input from me.

Best Regards,

Nick Srinivasan


#4

You are a genius!

When I ran atom --safe, the error message went away!

What do you mean, “Your path is also weird.”?

I do not get to choose my path.

When I download Atom, it installs itself automatically, without any input from me.

Best Regards,

Nick Srinivasan


#5

I’ve never seen test.atom in the path before.

As for your issue, safe mode is just to confirm where the problem is. You need to go into your init script, and delete the offending character. If you don’t know how, you can just delete the file itself, or the entire contents.


#6

The username is test. test\.atom is getting misrendered, because the forum’s markdown engine reads \. as a literal .. And Windows uses different slashes for its paths than everyone else because why not?


#7

**sighs loudly**


#8

Which platform would you recommend for software development? Apple or continue with Windows 10.

Never used Apple before.

Windows 10 is a pain. I agree that the back slash is a pain.

I would deeply appreciate your recommendation on the platform.

Regards,

Nick


#9

I can’t really say. I’ve never done software development (just a few packages for Atom).

I personally use a mac, and I’m completely happy with it. I’ve always been able to do what I wanted. I see people complain about this and that (for all operating systems), but I’ve never had any real issues before. I also seem to avoid all the mysterious bugs other people seem to get (though maybe only a small minority get them, and I just see them because I frequent this forum).

If you just want to change from Windows though, and you don’t want to pay the high price for an Apple computer, Linux is a good alternative. I haven’t used it yet, but I plan to.


#10

Much obliged!

Regards,

Nick


#11

Depends on what you’re doing. All platforms are pretty identical for most people. There are a few niche realms like open-source C/C++ projects that have lived on Linux forever, or C# which is mostly a Windows thing, or some graphics disciplines that have used Mac since Macromedia Flash was the cutting edge in computer graphics.


#12

I use Windows only because I like to buy video games from Steam and all of them have Windows compatibility. When I’m working with JavaScript or Python, or even my occasional forays into Arduino, there’s almost no difference for me between Windows and Linux (no Mac, because in order to use Mac, you have to buy lots of Apple hardware that’s more expensive and less compatible than other computers). If anything, Windows gets in the way, and I use software (cmder, occasionally MinGW) to make my Windows experience more like what I would get from Linux, when I’m not using ssh to work directly in a Linux terminal. At the same time, it’s kind of nice being on Windows and using Linux via SSH or VM because doing it the other way around would suck. I’m basically ignoring what makes Windows be Windows, but since I’m still using Windows, I can use it to do Windowsy things and Linuxy things, whereas if I had Linux I would only ever do Linuxy things.


#13

I cannot afford Apple products. Apple hardware is much more reliable than any Windows hardware. But, as you point out, Apple hardware is far more expensive than Windows platforms.

Windows platforms such as lenovo, HP, Acer-- they all crap-out every two years.


#14

It’s not (always) the hardware, which you can see by taking the majority of those machines and installing Linux on them. It works fantastically and will give any old computer a few more years of life. That means that the main malefactor is Windows itself. Windows is so cumbersome and so vulnerable to things that make it slow down little by little that slightly outdated processors get weighed down disproportionately.

All of my old computers (two at the moment, from about 2013 and 2015) have had Linux installed and they work great. One doesn’t have a functional screen, but that’s probably my fault for roughly handling it.


#15

I totally agree.