CoffeeScript Roadmap


#1

With CoffeeScript 2.0 released, I was wondering how the Atom developers are regarding it. When Atom was first launched, CoffeeScript was arguably more popular than it is now. ES2015/ES6 brought a lot of features to vanilla JavaScript that CoffeeScript already had, now what’s left is preference of Syntax: the Python/Ruby inspired CoffeeScript versus the C-like JavaScript. Is that enough to support both languages out of the box? Will CoffeeScript support wane? What are the current numbers for official and third-party packages, which language is primarily used these days? How would you handle CoffeeScript 1.x versus CoffeeScript 2.x – support both, introduce a breaking change (e.g. Atom 2.x)? I guess that even if automatic CoffeeScript transpilation was removed, package developers could still transpile at install-time.

Personally I kind of like the automatic transpilation feature since it involves only one step: restarting Atom. I always liked Ruby way (indentation, not brackets), but to be honest, I’m a bit tired of thinking in different syntaxes. So while most of my own packages are still written in CoffeeScript, I’m thinking more and more about moving to ES6 or even TypeScript.


No more Coffee. Decaffeinate the Atom's Core. Atom without Coffeescript
#2

You have an interesting question…
perhaps one that would open old wounds.
There was a lot of debate when Atom was young about Coffeescript vs Javascript.
It is was never really clear to me why technically go with Coffeescript.
This reason should still apply today just as much, surely.

I find it very telling that Atom is now including the Typescript grammar.
(Not to say that it should not be included.)
Let us not forget the push Microsoft provides for Typescript.

But at the end of the day, does it really matter which is chosen by package developers?


#3

@idleberg I think you will find my discussion here:


To be helpful in developing with CoffeeScript.

Contrary to public opinion CoffeeScript is NOT DEAD! (Long live CoffeeScript 2). you can do just about anything in CoffeeScript that you ever could in JavaScript (even es6). I am a big fan of their syntax and methodologies and would like to see them succeed.